Best Casting Line for Carp Fishing [Hit 30+ Wraps!]

  • By: Rob W (15 Years Carping Experience)
  • Published: December 11, 2022
  • Time to read: 5 min.
Affiliate Disclaimer

Carp Squad is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Thanks for supporting us!

Need to fish at range but hindered by your current mainline? It’s time to check out the best casting line for carp fishing.

Technique is probably the most important aspect of distance casting. But good technique can be limited by not using the correct gear, including your mainline.

Choosing the right casting line is fundamental to putting together the setup that will help you hit the distance.

A good casting line should be low in diameter, lacking stretch and be strong enough to take the brunt of the cast.

But what lines on the market are currently the best for casting?

Let’s take a look at the best casting lines for carp fishing at range.

5. Nash Bullet Mono

carp fishing line for casting

Nash Bullet has been around for years and it remains one of the most popular distance casting lines to this day.

Funnily enough, it was specifically designed by Nash to be a long distance line. Bullet was meant to be an everyday carp line for all manner of angling situations.

What became apparent over time though was how low in diameter Bullet is compared to other lines in the same breaking strain. At 12lb breaking strain, you’re looking at only 0.33mm diameter.

This makes for a great casting line, as it’s light and therefore provides less drag through the rod rings.

We’ve even checked it out on the Tackle Box Line tests too. It performs well both in terms of it’s stated diameter and breaking strain. The 12lb version breaks at around 13.5lb so you’ve got a bit of extra strength for the cast and your knots too.

It’s also worth mentioning that it comes in two different colours; green and brown. Both are sublt colours that are virtually invisible once submerged.

4. Fox Exocet Mono

best casting line for carp fishing

Exocet is Fox’s newest line, designed to overtake Soft Steel as their main distance mainline.

Being just 0.30mm at 13lb breaking strain, it’s one of the thinner casting lines on the market.

Fox have also worked hard on making sure this is as supple as it can be. Having used it myself, it really does maintain it’s flexibility and tends not to coil as much as cheaper lines.

Colour wise, it’s pretty good on that front too. A trans-khaki means it’s virtually invisible under water, although not as much as you can expect with a fluorocarbon mainline.

For a low diameter line, there is some good abrasion resistance. I wouldn’t class it as a snag fishing line in anyway, but you’ll be fine fishing at distance to islands etc.

Obviously with a specialist line like this, there is the obvious hike in price. Exocet is £23.99 for a 1000m bulk spool which might just about fill three big pit reels.

3. Daiwa Sensor

daiwa sensor good for distance

One line that you wouldn’t expect to see on this list is Daiwa Sensor. Like Nash Bullet, this line has been around for years with minimal changes.

But what we like most is the diameter of this line, which is fairly thin for the breaking strain.

Additionally, it breaks at a much higher strain than what’s stated on the label.

The brown version in particular is very strong. 12lb breaks at a whopping 16.5lb in the Tackle Box Annual Line Tests. You can rest assured you’ve got some extra strength in the tank for a long cast.

Perhaps the only downside we see with this line is the stretch in it. After a bit of use it does tend to coil and can result in it wrapping around the rod tip on the cast.

With that in mind, I always use it with a shockleader for distance casting.

Overall, you can certainly hit the distance with Daiwa Sensor. Plus it’s about half the cost of other distancing casting lines so you can respool often.

Check out our article where we reviewed Daiwa Sensor in full.

2. RM-Tec Orbit Double Tapered Mono

ridgemonkey distance casting line

RidgeMonkey rarely release bog-standard products so we’re always intrigued when they launch something.

Orbit Mono is RidgeMonkey’s latest mainline to hit the shelves, and this is a bit different to others we’ve featured before.

Orbit is specifically designed for distance casting, with a tapered, higher diameter section at each end. What this does is effectively act as a shock leader, without needing to tie something like Korda Armakord to the end of your mainline.

You might be wondering what the point of this is?

Well with waters that ban braided shockleaders, this stuff still abides by the rules.

You get the added protection of a stronger line to take the brunt of the cast, without having to use a ridiculously high diameter line on the rest of your spool.

If leader bans exist on your lake, RM-Tech Orbit should definitely be a consideration for your casting line.

1. Korda Longchuck Tapered Mainline

korda casting line for carp fishing
Many anglers rate Korda Longchuck as the best casting line for carp fishing.

With the launch of other tapered mainlines on the market, we knew it wouldn’t be long before Korda got involved.

Korda are known for producing some of the best lines in carp fishing, namely Carp Line and Kontour.

With the launch of Longchuck, they’ve taken their range to the next level to cater for anglers who want to fish at long distance.

Like RidgeMonkey Orbit, Longchuck is a low stretch mono that features a tapered section at either end of the spool. With it being low stretch, you’re able to really put some weight into a cast and compress the rod.

This isn’t always the case with mono with is often known to stretch and affect distance angling. Obviously it will never be as low stretch as braid, but having tried Longchuck, it’s not far off.

What else is quite impressive with this mono is simply how thin it is. Aside from the tapered section, the rest of the mono is only 0.30mm in the 12lb breaking strain.

If you haven’t already seen Terry Edmonds smashing this stuff to the horizon on instagram, I suggest you take a look. It’s the reason why we’ve ranked this as the best casting line for carp fishing at range.

About the writer

Rob W

I’m Rob, Carp Squad’s main contributor. I’ve been carp fishing on and off for 15 years, but the bug is well and truly back at the moment. Hopefully the articles I write on here help you put more carp on the bank!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *